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A Mini Historical Look at the Changing Racial Components of Treme’.

On May 18, 1896, the United States Supreme court ruled in favor of Ferguson in the famous “separate but equal” act that legalized segregation. The ruling would have a tremendously negative impact on the area of Treme’ as vast numbers of people of color left the neighborhood. St. Augustine church, which had always been integrated became almost all white. Things would later change again with the passing of the Civil rights Act in 1964, causing white-flight into the suburbs. The neighborhood would again undergo a metamorphosis post-Katrina as gentrification and its subsequent rising rental incomes prevented many from returning to Treme’. Consequently, the racial make-up is decidedly less black today than on the eve of Katrina. Despite the many changes, Treme’ remains the cultural heartbeat of New Orleans and a lure for the more adventurous traveler.

Mother-In-Law Lounge to Open Again!

To learn more fascinating details about Louis Armstrong, please visit the link below.

Louis Armstrong had many nicknames as a child to denote the rather large size of his mouth, such as “gatemouth”, “dippermouth”, and “satchelmouth”. While visiting England, he encountered Percy Brooks, the editor of  Melody Magazine, who greeted him with the title of “Satchmo”. Louis loved the shortening of “satchelmouth” and thus the new nickname stuck.
The statue of Louis Armstrong can be seen in Armstrong Park in the historic Treme’ neighborhood. 

Louis Armstrong had many nicknames as a child to denote the rather large size of his mouth, such as “gatemouth”, “dippermouth”, and “satchelmouth”. While visiting England, he encountered Percy Brooks, the editor of  Melody Magazine, who greeted him with the title of “Satchmo”. Louis loved the shortening of “satchelmouth” and thus the new nickname stuck.

The statue of Louis Armstrong can be seen in Armstrong Park in the historic Treme’ neighborhood. 

Tour Treme’ is Running!

Tour Treme’ is up and running following hurricane Isaac, so come on down and tour with us. Call us at 504-666-8300 or visit our website at www.frenchquarterphantoms.com

Senegambia and the Louisiana Slave Trade.

The vast majority of all slaves entering the colony under the French and Spanish were coming directly from Africa. These large importations included a plethora of various nations, such as that of the Bambara, Ado, Yoruba, Wolof, Fon, and Chamba among others. Many of these groupings originated in the Senegambia region of Africa. It is estimated that out of the nearly 388,000 Africans that came to America as slaves, almost 92,000 were Senegambians. Approximately 9,000 Senegambians went to the Gulf coast region especially Louisiana. This area of Africa was strongly influenced by Islam and thus many of the slaves would have had exposure to the religion to some degree, thus making the pre-auction “fattening” diet of bacon repulsive to many newly arrived slaves. For those interested in learning more about this particular region of Africa and its connection to the slave trade, I recommend Boubacar Berry’s Senegambia and the Atlantic Slave Trade.

Uncle Lionel of the Treme’ brass band passed away today. New Orleans has lost a legend. For those of you that heard him play, you will never forget him. For those of you that never had the good fortune to cross paths with him, you missed something special.

Uncle Lionel of the Treme’ brass band passed away today. New Orleans has lost a legend. For those of you that heard him play, you will never forget him. For those of you that never had the good fortune to cross paths with him, you missed something special.

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Kermit Ruffins opens speakeasy in the Treme'!